Suicide survivor’s giant hospital bill

By | April 20, 2019

An attempt at suicide could cost you more than your life.

An Oklahoma man shared an image to Twitter of his one-week, $ US93,000 ($ AUD 130,000) hospital bill after an attempt to take his own life.

Oliver Jordan, 21, shared the bill this week and garnered more than 25,000 likes and hundreds of responses.

“This is how expensive it is to attempt suicide in the US,” Jordan wrote in the tweet.

His followers were shocked, but some weren’t surprised: “In 2017 I was in the psych ward cause I was suicidal. I stayed a weekend. I’m now 10k in debt,” one response read.

Another wrote, “I think mine was ~*only*~ $ 32,000.”

Jordan, who works as a legal assistant in Tulsa told The Post that he’s lucky to have insurance, and that his out-of-pocket expenses were about $ US2,850 for the traumatic night last summer.

But “for someone who couldn’t afford insurance, this would be utterly catastrophic,” he said.

Items like laboratory work cost Jordan more than $ US29,000 while respiratory services cost more than $ US16,000.

While Jordan’s case is extreme, the typical tab for a US emergency room visit is still hard to fathom.

The average visit costs $ US1,917, according to the Health Care Cost Institute, which looked at data from 2016. A different study from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that some hospitals have mark-ups of more than 1000 per cent.

Jordan said he wasn’t thinking of the enormous hospital bill the night it happened — “I was unconscious before the ambulance arrived.” But even before his attempt, the thought alone of navigating “mental healthcare caused me to delay seeking treatment.”

He added the stress of his outstanding medical bills, as well as more recent bills, is “constant.”

“Receiving bills and notices for something that will likely take me years to pay off is … disheartening,” he said. “It leaves a hopeless feeling.”

If you or someone you know is in need of crisis or suicide prevention support, please call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or visit www.lifeline.org.au/gethelp

This story originally appeared on the New York Post and is republished here with permission.

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